Transition to Adulthood for Youth with ASD

  • View
    61

  • Download
    3

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

Transition to Adulthood for Youth with ASD. Beth Clavenna-Deane, PhD bacd@ku.edu University of Kansas, Center for Research on Learning April 4, 2011. Activity 1: THINK, PAIR, SHARE: Individuals with ASD?. What are your thoughts about what is happening to this population in adulthood?. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Text of Transition to Adulthood for Youth with ASD

Making the Transition to Adulthood a Success for Students with Asperger Syndrome

Transition to Adulthood for Youth with ASDBeth Clavenna-Deane, PhDbacd@ku.eduUniversity of Kansas, Center for Research on Learning

April 4, 20113/21/20111Why this topic??

From NLTS2 (2009): Ensuring that students with disabilities have access to and full participation in postsecondary education has been identified as one of the key challenges in the future of secondary education and transition for such students (National Center on Secondary Education and Transition 2003, p. 1). Postsecondary education has been linked to increased earning potential for youth who continue their education after high school, even for those who have not earned a degree (Marcotte et al. 2005).

13/21/2011Sabrina Van Buskirk, SHINES10@kc.rr.comBeth Clavenna-Deane, PhD bacd@ku.eduActivity 1: THINK, PAIR, SHARE: Individuals with ASD?What are your thoughts about what is happening to this population in adulthood?

2$971,0003/21/201140 years of being underemployed or unemployed in a lifetime. 33/21/2011Sabrina Van Buskirk, SHINES10@kc.rr.comBeth Clavenna-Deane, PhD bacd@ku.edu2009 NLTS2 dataPost-Secondary Enrollment 58% (any postsec)2-yr or community college: 38%Voc/business/technical school27%4-yr college22%Accommodations, self-disclosure, course of studyCompletionEnrolled90%Completed too small to report still within the 4 year range

Adapted from Morningstar, ME , Clavenna-Deane, B, 2009Newman, L., Wagner, M., Cameto, R., & Knokey, A.-M.(2009). www.nlts2.org/reports/2009_04/nlts2_report_2009_04_complete.pdf

Post School Outcomes for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders:Post-Secondary Education3/21/2011Interviewed Up to 4 years post high schoolApproximately 1080 1170 youth were interviewed

Postsecondary school enrollment (of all youth with disabilities 45%; youth in the general population 4 yrs out of HS: 53%youth with ASD 4 yrs out: 58%DID NOT consider themselves to have a disability 31%DID consider themselves to have a disability and sought out accommodations 55%DID consider themselves to have a disability BUT DID NOT Seek out accommodations 14% (second highest group SED first)

REFERENCE NEW ARTICLES AND WHAT THEY TELL US

What does this tell us still half of the students arent understanding the need for assistance that their disability requires and/or do not have the skills to seek out the support Self-awareness and self-advocacy

Intuitively we consider that most of the students are enrolled in math/science/engineering some are enrolled in Arts/Music, and some are enrolled in Humanities

SO what do these statistics tell us? What should we expect in terms of employment and postschool success?43/21/2011Sabrina Van Buskirk, SHINES10@kc.rr.comBeth Clavenna-Deane, PhD bacd@ku.edu

Employment2009 NLTS2 data

EmploymentAt time of interview47%Since HS66%Ave. # jobs,1.7Length of employment12.5 months Types of jobs, job satisfaction

Adapted from Morningstar, ME , Clavenna-Deane, B, 2009Newman, L., Wagner, M., Cameto, R., & Knokey, A.-M.(2009). www.nlts2.org/reports/2009_04/nlts2_report_2009_04_complete.pdf. 3/21/20115Employment at time of interview - as compared to other SWDs LD 63, Speech 58, ED 43; since HS LD- 77, Speech 73, ED 64.Why compare to these three groups? - Ask the audience what is the purpose of looking at the results of these three groups in comparison to Students with ASDTop three types of jobs: Food service, stocking/shipping/receiving, cleaning, assembly/sortingWhy these jobs because 4 years post-high school those interviewed who were employed were likely those with more severe autism who were likely in these more traditional industrial/sheltered work environments.

Reference new articles for just individuals with ASHowlin (2000)Mean employment rate 31%Range 5% to 55%Eaves and Ho (2008)HFA and AS30% of those interviewed were underemployed

Clavenna-Deane (2009)Adults with AS identified underemployment, unemployment due to social communication, goal setting difficulties

53/21/2011Sabrina Van Buskirk, SHINES10@kc.rr.comBeth Clavenna-Deane, PhD bacd@ku.eduIndependent Living2009 NLTS2 data

Living on Own11% Intimate relationships21% Steady partner3% Financial independenceAnnual income 25000 or less94%, friendships, community participation

Adapted from Morningstar, ME , Clavenna-Deane, B, 2009Newman, L., Wagner, M., Cameto, R., & Knokey, A.-M.(2009). www.nlts2.org/reports/2009_04/nlts2_report_2009_04_complete.pdf. 3/21/20116Up to 4 years post-high school

Living on own 11% (vs. 28% LD; 24% SPL, 21% EDonly group with lower rates were MR (8%). Sexual relationships 21% vs LD 78, SPL 56, ED 78) LOWEST GROUPSteady partner 3 % vs 10 LD, 7 SLP, 12, ED again LOWEST GROUP

Friendships second lowest group to have established friendships that communicated with dailyCommunity participation below average for SWDS SWDS 30%, ASD 23%.

Looking more carefully at these statistics what do we see

Reference new research2008 OUTCOMES RESEARCHSaulnier klin2008 outcomes gillstedt2

63/21/2011Sabrina Van Buskirk, SHINES10@kc.rr.comBeth Clavenna-Deane, PhD bacd@ku.eduIntroductory Conclusions:

What are some judgments we can make from these statistics?Adult success?Previous high school experiences?3/21/2011Put a name with these statistics Made to Stick. Statistics are just numbers, names have faces, are sitting in chairs in our classrooms and not succeeding in their adult lives WHY?

73/21/2011Sabrina Van Buskirk, SHINES10@kc.rr.comBeth Clavenna-Deane, PhD bacd@ku.eduTransition ComplianceIndicator 13 of the State Performance Plan:

Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals that are annually updated and based upon an age appropriate transition assessment, transition services, including courses of study, that will reasonably enable the student to meet those postsecondary goals, and annual IEP goals related to the students transition services needs. There also must be evidence that the student was invited to the IEP Team meeting where transition services are to be discussed and evidence that, if appropriate, a representative of any participating agency was invited to the IEP Team meeting with the prior consent of the parent or student who has reached the age of majority. (20 U.S.C. 1416(a)(3)(B))

Beth Clavenna-Deane, PhD bacd@ku.edu3/21/2011Sabrina Van Buskirk, SHINES10@kc.rr.com8Transition PlanningKey componentsMeasurable postsecondary goalsAge-appropriate transition assessmentsInvitation of the studentInteragency collaborationTransition ServicesCourse of study3/21/2011Variance in planning and implementation across the spectrum

On the IEP and in practice transition services is where social work activities can fit it.

93/21/2011Sabrina Van Buskirk, SHINES10@kc.rr.comBeth Clavenna-Deane, PhD bacd@ku.eduTransition Assessment for Students with ASDTTAPBrigance Transition InventorySelf-Directed Search, IDEAS, ChoicesInformal Assessments Book from ClarkOrganizational Skills Assessment from Winner

Why these assessments?Why is assessment the first step?What else is critical when transition planning?Social/behavioral/adaptive

10Now where do we focus our energy for for students on the spectrum?3/21/2011So to make Transition Services happen.where do we need to focus our energies113/21/2011Sabrina Van Buskirk, SHINES10@kc.rr.comBeth Clavenna-Deane, PhD bacd@ku.eduSocial Communication StrategiesSocial Thinking CurriculumSocial Behavior MappingSocial StoriesSocial Scripts3/21/2011Beth Clavenna-Deane, PhD bacd@ku.edu3/21/2011Sabrina Van Buskirk, SHINES10@kc.rr.com12Social Behavior MappingWhat is it?How can it be used most effectively?

3/21/2011Beth Clavenna-Deane, PhD bacd@ku.edu3/21/2011Sabrina Van Buskirk, SHINES10@kc.rr.com13Post-Secondary Education EnvironmentsCollegeCommunity College Technical SchoolsWhat are the similarities and differences amongst these experiences?14High School versus Post-Secondary High School = STATICEntitlement SystemAll AccommodationsStructured Daily WorkWeekly TestsSPED teacherAnnual IEPSchools identify and provide servicesLife Skills taught at home or possibly by school staff

Post-Secondary = DYNAMICEligibility SystemReasonable AccommodationsLong term projectsCumulative ExamsDisability Support Services504 Accessibility PlanSelf-disclose to receive servicesLife/Organizational SkillsComplied from: The MO-AHEAD College Guide www.mo-ahead.org & Winner, M.G. (2009). Preparing for the Transition to Adulthood. www.socialthinking.comTransition Planning3/21/201115But for all post-secondary educational environments these changes hold true

First look at the significant differences between high school and collegeWehmans presentation entitlement versus eligibility.

But more specifically look at supports in high school versus supports in college logistics of supports as well as structure of the activities.153/21/2011Sabrina Van Buskirk, SHINES10@kc.rr.comBeth Clavenna-Deane, PhD bacd@ku.eduA Day in the LifeChecklist template Emily Holman MacNaughton and Beth Clavenna-DeaneWhat are some areas that are predictable?What are some surprises that you see?Roommate versus Private RoomFinancesSocial OpportunitiesIndependent LivingBeth Clavenna-Deane, PhD bacd@ku.edu3/21/2011Sabrina Van Buskirk, SHINES10@kc.rr.com16Independent Living Skills:Domains to Focus onFinancial Decision MakingLife SkillsHome Organizational SkillsPersonal SpaceMultitaskingGrooming/HygieneNutrition/ExerciseCare of ClothingResponsibility for personal belongingsHealth/Emergency Care

Winner, M.G. (2009). Organizing Strategies to Prepare for Homework and the Real World:An interdiscip