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1 Summary Report December 2008 © 2008 TNS UK Limited. All rights reserved TNS Job Number: 181283 Taking Part 2008

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1 Summary Report December 2008 2008 TNS UK Limited. All rights reserved TNS Job Number: 181283 Taking Part 2008 Slide 2 2 How to view this report slide show options Please select the version of the slide show that you would like to view by clicking on the appropriate box. To return to this page at any time click on the Scottish Arts Council logo at the top right of the screen. Under-represented group summaries: Residents of deprived areas People with disabilities Women Summary top line results Residents of rural areas People aged 65 or over People aged 16 to 24 Minority ethnic communities Regional summaries: Edinburgh and surrounds East and Central Scotland Highlands & Islands North East Scotland Glasgow and surrounds South West Scotland South of Scotland Art form profiles Full results including background Appendix definitions and method Attitudes and segmentation analysis Slide 3 3 Background The Scottish Arts Council is the leading organisation involved in supporting and developing the arts in Scotland. TNS were commissioned to provide up to date information on levels of attendance and participation in arts related activities in Scotland. The study follows previous surveys carried out in 2004 and 2006. This study provides a further survey wave to give more insight into attendance and participation trends. Slide 4 4 Research objectives The specific objectives of the 2008 study were as follows: To collect data that is robust enough to allow reporting against the baseline data for each target, to allow for identification of any statistically significant change in the overall level of attendance and participation among the adult (aged 16+) population in Scotland. To collect robust data amongst each of the following under-represented groups based on aggregation of attendance and participation levels at art events and activities; minority ethnic communities disabled people people aged 16-24 people aged 65+ people living in deprived areas people living in rural areas women To ensure that all the data will allow any statistical variations in attendance and participation to be identified. To explore and examine as far as possible, any variations/trends/issues from the 2004/2006/2008 data from the perspective of the population of Scotland as a whole, for a number of key under-represented groups as well as any regional/ local differences. Slide 5 5 Survey method 4,941 face to face in-home interviews undertaken throughout Scotland. Fieldwork took place between March and June 2008. Of this total, 2,110 represented the core sample, representative of the Scottish population in terms of geographical distribution, age, working status, ethnicity and socio-economic grade. Additional booster sampling was undertaken amongst minority groups. These booster interviews were combined with the core interviews to allow separate analysis by under represented group. Booster interviews were also undertaken in certain geographic areas of Scotland to allow for analysis by regional area. If possible, comparisons have been made with the 2004 and 2006 Taking Part results. If no data is included for a particular year, this indicates a year where no comparable question was asked. Slide 6 6 Attendance and participation Scottish adult population 2008 TNS UK Limited. All rights reserved TNS Job Number: 181283 Slide 7 7 Attendance within the last 12 months By art form categories Base: 2004 (2,020), 2006 (2,029), 2008 (2,110) In 2008 there was a statistically significant increase in attendance at music and visual arts events but a decrease in attendance at dance events. Around three-quarters of Scottish adults attended one or more arts event (77%), similar to the proportions recorded in 2006 and 2004. Slide 8 8 Attendance within last 12 months All activities The 2008 survey recorded increased attendance at rock/pop events and art galleries. Base: 2004 (2,020), 2006 (2,029), 2008 (2,110) Slide 9 9 Participation within last 12 months By art form categories Overall participation levels decreased by 5 percentage points since 2006 but remained above the 2004 levels. The 2008 survey recorded a decrease in the proportion of Scottish adults reading and buying books but no significant changes in other categories Base: 2004 (2,020), 2006 (2,029), 2008 (2,110) Slide 10 10 Participation within last 12 months All activities Base: 2004 (2,020), 2006 (2,029), 2008 (2,110) Since 2006, decreases in the proportions reading books, buying non-fiction, undertaking knitting/other textile crafts and buying works of art or crafts. Slide 11 11 Attendance and participation Under represented groups 2008 TNS UK Limited. All rights reserved TNS Job Number: 181283 Slide 12 12 Summary Combined attendance and participation by group Between 2006 and 2008, no statistically significant increases or decreases, overall, or amongst any of the under represented groups. Slide 13 13 Summary Attendance by group Between 2006 and 2008, a decrease in attendance amongst ethnic minority communities. No other significant changes. Slide 14 14 Summary Participation by group Between 2006 and 2008, a decrease in participation at all adults level and amongst disabled people and women. Slide 15 15 Attendance Residents of deprived areas 69% attendance lower than amongst residents of other areas in Scotland (78%) KEY FACTS A similar overall level of attendance to 2006 (67%) and 2004 (67%). Change is not statistically significant. Compared to others, less likely to attend rock or pop music events, musicals, cinema or plays. Compared to 2006, increased attendance at art galleries (15% to 24%). Slide 16 16 Participation Residents of deprived areas 66% participation lower than in other areas in Scotland (71%) KEY FACTS A similar overall level of participation to that recorded in 2006 (68%) but higher than in 2004 (52%). Compared to residents of other areas, less likely to read books, buy a work of art or buy non-fiction. Compared to 2006, decreased participation in reading books (61% to 57%). Slide 17 17 Attendance Disabled people 49% attendance lower than amongst other respondents (82%) KEY FACTS A similar overall level of attendance to that recorded in 2006 (48%) and 2004 (50%). Change is not statistically significant. Compared to other respondents, less likely to go to cinema, museums or rock & pop events. Compared to 2006, increased attendance at art galleries (13% to 18%). Slide 18 18 Participation Disabled people 65% participation lower than amongst other respondents (71%) KEY FACTS Overall participation decreased from 70% in 2006 to 65% (but remained higher than 2004 - 58%) Less likely to read or buy books. Compared to 2006, decreased participation in crafts (21% to 12%). Slide 19 19 Attendance Women 77% overall attendance amongst women similar to men (76%) KEY FACTS Overall attendance in 2008 remained at the same level as recorded in 2006 (77%) Compared to males, less likely to attend rock or pop music events, but more likely to attend pantomimes or musicals. Compared to 2006, increased attendance at art galleries (23% to 29%) and museums (28% to 33%). Slide 20 20 Participation Women 75% participation amongst women higher than amongst males (66%) KEY FACTS Participation overall was lower than recorded in 2006 (80%) but still higher than in 2004 (69%). Compared to males, more likely to have read books, or take part in knitting/any other crafts. Compared to 2006, decreased participation in reading and buying books (73% to 66%). Slide 21 21 Attendance Residents of rural areas 75% attendance similar to residents of other areas (78%) KEY FACTS A similar overall level of attendance to that recorded in 2006 (74%) and 2004 (75%). Change is not statistically significant. Compared to other areas, less likely to have visited the cinema or art galleries but more likely to have attended Scottish music events. Compared to 2006, increased attendance at rock & pop events (15% to 24%). Slide 22 22 Participation Residents of rural areas 74% participation slightly higher than residents of other areas, but not statistically significant (70%). KEY FACTS Participation remained at the same level as recorded in 2006 (74%). Compared to residents of other areas, more likely to have undertaken crafts (17% v 11%). Slide 23 23 Attendance Aged 65 and over 49% attendance much lower than amongst respondents aged under 65 (83%). KEY FACTS A similar overall level of attendance to that recorded in 2006 (49%) and 2004 (52%). Change is not statistically significant. Compared to those under 65, much less likely to attend rock or pop music events, cinema or museums. Attendance across specific activities also remained broadly similar in 2008. Slide 24 24 Participation Aged 65 and over 66% participation slightly lower than amongst those aged under 65 (71%) KEY FACTS A similar overall level of participation to that recorded in 2006 (69%) and 2004 (61%). Compared to those under 65, less likely to have bought a work of fiction, or participated in painting or drawing. Compared to 2006, decreased participation in knitting and other textile crafts (15% to 8%). Slide 25 25 Attendance Aged 16-24 92% attendance higher than amongst respondents aged 25 and over (75%). KEY FACTS A similar overall level of attendance to that recorded in 2006 (93%) and 2004 (87%). Compared to those aged 25 and over, more likely to go to cinema and rock or pop music events, but less likely to attend pantomimes. Compared to 2006, increased attendance at rock and pop events (40% to 50%) and art galleries (15% to 24%). Slide 26 26 Participation Aged 16-24 68% participation similar to respondents aged 25 and over (71%). KEY FACTS Overall participation was lower than recorded in 2006 (73%) but similar to the participation level recorded in 2004 (65%). Changes are not statistically significant. More likely than those respondents aged 25 and over to have participated in painting/drawing or playi

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