Smarter Balanced Assessment & Higher Education

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Smarter Balanced Assessment & Higher Education. Bill Moore, SBCTC Core to College Alignment Director. Overview and Consortium Proposal under Consideration Winter 2013. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Smarter Balanced Assessment & Higher EducationBill Moore, SBCTCCore to College Alignment DirectorOverview and Consortium Proposal under ConsiderationWinter 2013For more information about Smarter Balanced work described in these slides, see http://www.smarterbalanced.org/achievement-level-descriptors-and-college-readiness/ Common Core State StandardsClear, consistent, rigorous standards in English language arts/literacy and mathematics

Knowledge and skills needed for college and career success

Developed voluntarily and cooperatively by states with input from teachers and college faculty

Source: www.corestandards.org

What is Smarter Balanced?A consortium of 25 states working together to build next-generation formative, interim and summative assessments for K-12 schools tied to the Common Core State Standards in English language arts/literacy and mathematics.Funding from the federal Race to the Top Assessment grant (~$175M) and foundations (~$3M).Governed by member states on a consensus model.

2Major Shifts in the CCSS:Fewer, Higher, Clearer, DeeperMATH

Focus: strongly where the standards focus

Coherence: Think across grades and link to major topics within grades

Rigor: Require conceptual understanding, fluency, and applicationwww.corestandards.orgELA

Building content knowledge through content-rich nonfiction

Reading, writing, and speaking grounded in evidence from text, both literary and informational

Regular practice with complex text and its academic language

Research has consistently shown that the single most powerful predictor of student success in college is the rigor of academic preparation.

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Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium25 states (21 governing, 4 advisory)K-12 & Higher Education Leads in each stateWashington state is the fiscal agent for the ConsortiumA Balanced Assessment SystemCommon Core State Standards specify K-12 expectations for college and career readinessAll students leave high school college and career ready Teachers and schools have information and tools they need to improve teaching and learning

Interim assessments Flexible, open, used for actionable feedbackSummative assessments Benchmarked to college and career readinessTeacher resources for formative assessment practicesto improve instruction5Summative Assessment:Two-pronged ApproachAdvantages to Higher EducationHigher Educations Involvement MattersReaching the Goal: Expectations of Higher EducationCollege Content Readiness DefinitionsEnglish language arts/literacyStudents who perform at the College Content-ready level in English language arts/literacy demonstrate subject-area knowledge and skills associated with readiness for entry-level, transferable credit-bearing English and composition courses. These students also demonstrate reading, writing, listening, and research skills necessary for introductory courses in a variety of disciplines.MathematicsStudents who perform at the College Content-Ready Level in mathematics demonstrate subject-area knowledge and skills associated with readiness for entry-level, transferable credit-bearing mathematics or statistics courses. These students also demonstrate quantitative reasoning skills necessary for introductory courses in a variety of disciplines. How well does the language in these definitions articulate what it means to be ready for the English language arts and math expectations students will encounter in entry college-level courses?Key points: content readiness onlyreadiness, not successtransferableexemption from remediation, not placement10Smarter Balanced Policy Achievement Level DescriptorsLevel 1Level 2Level 3Level 4The Level 1 student demonstrates minimal command of the knowledge and skills associated with college and career readiness.The Level 2 student demonstrates partial command of the knowledge and skills associated with college and career readiness.

The Level 3 student demonstrates sufficient command of the knowledge and skills associated with college and career readiness.

The Level 4 student demonstrates deep command of the knowledge and skills associated with college and career readiness.

College Readiness ThresholdThese are the Policy ALDs based on the overall claim for grade 11. The policy ALDs for Grades 3-8 are similar

30 K-12 panelists, All governing states represented21 higher education (HE) panelists, All but one governing state represented (NH did not submit a nominee)--tried to balance district type & %FRLMore than 80 percent of panelists agreed that: 1) The process would results in valid ALDs and 2) They supported the rigor of the ALDs

11College Readiness Policy FrameworkSmarter Balanced LevelCollege Content-ReadinessImplications for Grade 12 and College Placement4: Demonstrates deep command of the knowledge and skills associated with college and career readiness.Student is exempt from developmental course work.States/districts/colleges may offer advanced courses (such as AP, IB, or dual enrollment) for these students. Colleges may evaluate additional data (courses completed, grades, placement test scores, etc.) to determine student placement in advanced courses beyond the initial entry-level course.3: Demonstrates sufficient command of the knowledge and skills associated with college and career readiness. Student is exempt from developmental course work, contingent on evidence of continued learning in Grade 12.Within each state, higher education and K-12 determine appropriate evidence of continued learning (such as test scores or course grades).Colleges may evaluate additional data (courses completed, grades, placement test scores, etc.) to determine student placement in advanced courses beyond the initial entry-level course.What questions or issues, if any, do you have regarding the proposed implications noted above for students scoring at Level 3 or Level 4 on the 11th grade Smarter Balanced assessment?