Jewish Treats’ Complete Guide to Rosh Hashana

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The Jewish Treats’ Complete Guide to Rosh Hashana is designed to engage and inspire those who are active in the social media universe. Easily downloadable for even those who are not very computer savvy, NJOP’s eGuide makes the customs and traditions associated with Rosh Hashana both accessible and meaningful. This very contemporary guide provides in-depth explanations, delicious recipes and personal inspirational thoughts and experiences associated with Rosh Hashana. Jewish Treats’ Complete Guide to Rosh Hashana is an invaluable tool for all Jews, especially those who may never have experienced the majesty and inspirational nature of Rosh Hashana.

Text of Jewish Treats’ Complete Guide to Rosh Hashana

  • Complete Guideto Rosh Hashana

    Complete Guide to Rosh Hashana

    CREATED BY: NJOP

  • Jewish Treats Guide toGuide to Preparing a Seder

    Jewish Treats Guide to Sukkot

    Table of ContentsThe Names of Rosh Hashana ................................................2

    Preparing for Rosh Hashana .................................................3

    Holiday Greetings .................................................................4

    Birthday of the World ............................................................5

    Meaningful Foods .................................................................6

    Levana Kirschenbaums Rosh Hashana Recipes ....................8

    Insights into the Torah Reading...........................................10

    Rosh Hashana Favorites......................................................11

    The Stirring Sounds of the Shofar........................................12

    Shofar Facts ........................................................................13

    Prayers of the Day...............................................................14

    Tashlich: Casting Away Sin..................................................16

    Tashlich: A Prayer ...............................................................17

    Game Corner......................................................................18

    How to Make Rosh Hashana Meaningful for Kids ...............20

    A Rosh Hashana Parable.....................................................21

    The Next Step......................................................................22

    Susie Fishbeins Honey Cake Recipe ...................................23

    Game Answer Key ..............................................................24

    Glossary..............................................................................25

  • Jewish Treats Guide to Sukkot

    WELCOME TO JEWISH TREATS

    Complete Guide to Rosh Hashana

    Jewish Treats is delighted to introduce ournew eBook: Complete Guide to Rosh Hashana-your online resource for the Jewish New Year.This eBook includes a little of everything.Inside you will discover the significance ofpomegranates, the spiritual sounds of theshofar and the secrets of casting away sins.Weve included some delicious recipes,fascinating facts, and lots of family fun as well!

    Click here for a message from our Director.

    Sing your way into Rosh Hashana! Enjoy Jewish TreatsSoul Bigger (The Rosh Hashana Song)

    From everyone at NJOP and Jewish Treats,we wish you a sweet and happy New Year!

    CreditsFounder:Rabbi Ephraim Z. Buchwald

    Edited By:

    Sarah Rochel Hewitt

    Content:

    Sarah Rochel Hewitt

    Social Media:

    Susanne Goldstone Rosenhouse

    Graphic Design:

    Van Huynh, Gilly Rosenthol

    Contributors:

    Rabbi Avrohom M. Alter,

    Esti Berkowitz, Rabbi Yonah

    Bookstein, Susie Fishbein,

    Levana Kirshenbaum

    Dedicated to my Rav and my friend Rabbi Yitzchak Rosenbaum,who has helped so many of his fellow Jews find their way to becoming

    Frum Jews with his tireless patience for all. We wish him and his Rebbitzen much mazal and manysimchas when they move to Eretz Yisrael.

    Yitzchak, you will be missed so very much.

    With love and admiration, your student, and friend, Andy Siegel

  • Jewish Treats Guide to Sukkot

    Jewish Treats Complete Guide to Rosh Hashana 2

    The Names ofROSH HASHANA

    This first of Tishrei is the Day of Judgment because it is Yom Hazikaron, the day on whichGod looks back and remembers our deeds, individually, collectively and historically (a recordof over 3,000 years of Jewish history). While remembering our deeds, God is able to judgeour actions and our growth as people.

    Why is the first of Tishrei known as YomHazikaron? Because it is the anniversary of thecreation of the world (Yom Harat Olam--seepage 7). Since the annual cycle is now closing, itis the perfect time for reflection and judgment.This new beginning allows the people to enterthe new year with a clean slate. And since theold and the new years are seamless, today isalso Rosh Hashana, the head of the year, whenwe begin the new calendar year (e.g. from 5774to 5775).

    Most everyone refers to Rosh Hashana as theJewish New Year. Indeed that is the best knownaspect of the holiday. But being the new year isactually only a secondary facet of this joyful holiday.

    There are several names for the first of Tishrei,each of which reflects a different aspect of theholiday.

    In the Torah, the day is called Yom Teruah, referring to the staccato sound blown on theshofar. The Teruah of the shofar serves as a callto attention to the Jewish people, alerting themthat this day is Yom Hadin, the Day of Judgment.

    More Than Just a New Years Celebration

    Yom Teruahmeans The Day of the Sounding(of the Shofar).

    Yom Hadinmeans The Day of Judgment.

    Yom Hazikaronmeans The Day of Remembering.

    Yom Harat Olammeans The Day of the Birth of the World.

    Rosh Hashana means Head of the Year.

  • Jewish Treats Complete Guide to Rosh Hashana 3

    PREPARING FORRosh Hashana

    Imagine receiving a notice from the IRS that you aregoing to be audited in one month. You become frantic.After all, receipts and credit slips are scattered indrawers and piles throughout the house. Now youhave only a month to find them. The beginning of themonth of Elul marks the one month notice until theDivine audit is to take place on Rosh Hashana.

    Throughout the month of Elul, Jews search for everyreceipt and credit slip left by their behavior.

    Did I belittle the secretary who couldnt remembermy name? Did I borrow $20 and forget to returnit? Last week, I did help my elderly neighbor carryin her groceries. Did I?

    Elul is the time to look back over the past year, sortout our strengths and weaknesses, and see what impact our deeds have had. Like sorting the receipts,we can place our actions into little piles: wrong toGod, our fellow humans or even ourselves, andgood to God, our fellow humans or ourselves.Sometimes an action may fall intoseveral categories.Reviewing our behavior is, accordingto the medievalscholar Rabbi Moses ben Maimon (Maimonides/Rambam), the first step in the teshuva (repentance)process. The Jewish view of repentance goes muchfurther than mere regret. Teshuva is a proactiveprocess that recognizes our fallibility and our abilityto change.

    People err. The Bible is full of people messing up.What is important, however, is that one learn fromhis/her mistakes. The first step in setting thingsstraight is recognizing the problem and ceasing theincorrect behavior. For many, recognizing a negativebehavior is painfully difficult. After all, its so easy tojustify our actions -- Well, he shouldnt have cut meoff, I had every right to yell at him! The govern-ment already gets enough money, I dont have todeclare this on my taxes! Hey, so what if I toldthem that I saw her out late last night? Everybodyknows shes a real partier! But rationalizationsdont render the actions correct, they only make therationalizers feel better about their behavior. Admitting that an action was wrong, or that it mayhave hurt someone, takes courage and honesty.Stopping the behavior is an even greater challenge.

    While people should really strive to improve them-selves throughout the year, as the month of Elul begins and the shofar is sounded*, we are remindedthat there is just one month left. Thirty days remainto check ones balance and settle old accounts. Byusing Elul to prepare, one is able to face the Divineaudit on Rosh Hashana with clarity and confidence,knowing that one has moved toward his/her spiritual goal and has made a better connectionwith the power of the day, and with God.

    * It is customary for the shofar to be sounded in thesynagogue at every morning service throughout themonth of Elul, except for Shabbat and the day beforeRosh Hashana

    Maimonides Four Steps of Teshuva1. Recognize and discontinue the improper action.

    2. Verbally confess the action, thus giving the action a concrete form in your own mind.

    3. Regret the action. Evaluate the negative impactthis action may have had on yourself or on others.

    4. Determine never to repeat the action.

  • Jewish Treats Guide to Sukkot

    Jewish Treats Complete Guide to Rosh Hashana 4

    HolidayGREETINGSThe standard pre-Rosh Hashana greeting of Ktivavachatima tova (May you be written and sealedfor good) is deduced from a Talmudic discussionconcerning the three heavenly books that areopened during the High Holidays.

    Rabbi Jochanan (as quoted by Rabbi Kruspedai)clarified that on the New Year three Divine booksare opened. There is a book for the completelywicked, a book for the completely righteous and abook for those in the middle. According to RabbiAvin, the existence of these books is alluded to inPsalms 69:29: Let them be blotted out of the bookof the living, and not be written with the righteous.According to Rabbi Nahman ben Isaac, Moses actu-ally refers to the book in Exodus 32:32: ...blot me, Ipray You, out of Your book which You have written(Rosh Hashana 16b).

    Both of the proof-texts brought in the Talmud appear torefer only to a Book of the Righteous. Since traditionhas it that the world is balanced between extremes(prophecy was balanced by idolatry, Moses was bal-anced by Bilaam), a Book of the Wicked must alsoexist. This, of course, leaves a gap for those who areneither completely righteous nor completely wicked...inother words, the majority of humanity. Thus, it couldonly be assumed that there is a third book.

    Rabbi Kruspedai further explains that on the first nightof Rosh Hashana the completely