Team Initiated Problem Solving TIPS

  • Published on
    25-Feb-2016

  • View
    43

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

Team Initiated Problem Solving TIPS. Presented by Rob H. Horner & Anne W. Todd, University of Oregon On Behalf of Steve Newton, Bob Algozzine and Kate Algozzine. Todays Goals. All able to realize coaching support in: Use roles and meeting foundations - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Transcript

Slide 1

Team Initiated Problem SolvingTIPS

Presented by Rob H. Horner & Anne W. Todd, University of Oregon

On Behalf of Steve Newton, Bob Algozzine and Kate Algozzine

Todays Goals

All able to realize coaching support in:

Use roles and meeting foundations

Build roles: facilitator, minute taker and data analyst

Meeting Foundations Checklist

Electronic meeting minutes

Use the TIPS problem solving model during meetings

Data-based Decision-making rules

Defining problems with precision

Building practical solutions

Implement the solutions developed during meetings

Building action plans to implement solutions.

Assess if action plans benefit students

2

Newton, J. S., Todd, A. W., Algozzine, K., Horner, R. H., & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon, unpublished training manual.

Participants will span the range of roles including team members, coaches and trainers, and some will have a combination of roles. Today we want teams/coaches to

understand how the Meeting Foundations Checklist and Meeting Minute form are used to support team functioning and sustainability.

Be able to use the TIPS problem solving model to simulated SWIS summary data.

Review specific goals above.

2

Part 1

Overview of TIPS Model

People arent tired from solving problems they are tired from solving the same problem over and over.

4

Newton, J. S., Todd, A. W., Algozzine, K., Horner, R. H., & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon, unpublished training manual.

4

It isnt whether you have a problem, its whether you have the same problem again next year.

Admiration of the problems is contagious!

What do we need?

A clear model with steps for problem solving

Access to the right information at the right time in the right format

A formal process that a group of people can use to build and implement solutions.

5

Newton, J. S., Todd, A. W., Algozzine, K., Horner, R. H., & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon, unpublished training manual.

To use data for progress monitoring and for decision making we need to engage in problem solving that provides access to the right type of current data, a system/process for using those data and strategies for using those during the problem solving process.

5/3/2012

Newton, J. S., Todd, A. W., Algozzine, K., Horner, R. H., & Algozzine, B. 2008

5

Action

Planning

Improving Decision-Making

Problem

Problem

Solution

From

To

Problem

Solving

Information

Solution

6

TIPS Model

TIPS Training

TIPS Coaches Training

TIPS Team training (initial and booster)

On-line TA Meetings for Coaches

Three coached meetings for teams

Team Meeting

Use of electronic meeting minute system

Formal roles (facilitator, recorder, data analyst)

Specific expectations (before meeting, during meeting, after meeting)

Access and use of data

Projected meeting minutes

Research tool to measure effectiveness of TIPS Training

DORA (decision, observation, recording and analysis)

Measures Meeting Foundations & Thoroughness of Problem Solving

Newton, J. S., Todd, A. W., Algozzine, K., Horner, R. H., & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon, unpublished manual.

9

TIPS Training is a package across time starting with one full day of team training (the binder has all the materials, the thumb drive has the files) Followed by two coached meetings. Coaching includes:

Prompting & supporting the facilitator, minute taker and data analyst to prepare for meetings

Prompting the use of the TIPS model during meetings

Helping the team stay focused during meetings

Points to make: tough to build fluency if meeting once a month. The frequency is too lean.

7

Collect

and Use

Data

Develop

Hypothesis

Discuss and

Select

Solutions

Develop and

Implement

Action Plan

Evaluate and

Revise

Action Plan

Problem Solving Meeting Foundations

Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Model

Identify

Problems

Newton, J. S., Todd, A. W., Algozzine, K., Horner, R. H., & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon, unpublished training manual.

8

The TIPS model

The larger outer circle is the system of Meeting Foundations that supports the use of the problem solving model

Meeting Foundations were taught earlier in the training

The inner circles provide the strategies for using data to identify and solve problems

5/3/2012

Newton, J. S., Todd, A. W., Algozzine, K., Horner, R. H., & Algozzine, B. 2008

8

TIPS Model

Team Meeting

Use of electronic agenda

Formal roles (facilitator, recorder, data analyst)

Specific expectations (before meeting, during meeting, after meeting)

Expected use of data

Data Collection Tool

DORA

Foundations Thoroughness

TIPS I Study: Todd et al., 2011

School A

School B

School C

School D

Baseline Coaching TIPS

% DORA Foundations Score

Solid = SW PBIS meetings

using SWIS

Open = progress monitoring

meeting using DIBELS

Journal of Applied School Psychology

10

BaselineOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay0.910.820000000000000950.910.820000000000000950.820000000000000950.72000000000000097CoachedOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay0.911Post-TIPSOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay0.9110.9110.640000000000009010.9110.91BaselineOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay0.910.820000000000000950.910.820000000000000950.820000000000000950.72000000000000097CoachedOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay0.911Post-TIPSOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay0.9110.9110.640000000000009010.9110.91

BaselineOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay0.640000000000009010.730000000000000980.820000000000000950.820000000000000950.640000000000009010.640000000000009010.67000000000001103CoachedOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay10.9Post-TIPSOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay0.910.90.820000000000000950.820000000000000950.820000000000000951110.910.91BaselineOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay0.640000000000009010.730000000000000980.820000000000000950.820000000000000950.640000000000009010.640000000000009010.67000000000001103CoachedOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay10.9Post-TIPSOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay0.910.90.820000000000000950.820000000000000950.820000000000000951110.910.91

BaselineOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay0.730000000000000980.820000000000000950.730000000000000980.730000000000000980.6400000000000140.550000000000000040.820000000000000950.36CoachedOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay0.910.82000000000000095Post-TIPSOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay10.550000000000000040.91

BaselineOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay0.450.550000000000000040.450.660000000000015020.270.360.45CoachedOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay0.920.73000000000000098Post-TIPSOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay10.82000000000000095

TIPS I Study: Todd et al., 2011

School A

School D

School C

Baseline Coaching TIPS

% DORA Thoroughness Score

Journal of Applied School Psychology

Solid = SW PBIS meetings

using SWIS

Open = progress monitoring

meeting using DIBELS

11

BaselineOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay0.550000000000000040.430.250.270.460.75000000000000799CoachedOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay10.85000000000000098Post-TIPSOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay0.7600000000000090.920.860000000000000990.850000000000000980.950000000000000950.6900000000000009510.95000000000000095BaselineOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay0.550000000000000040.430.250.270.460.75000000000000799CoachedOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay10.85000000000000098Post-TIPSOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay0.7600000000000090.920.860000000000000990.850000000000000980.950000000000000950.6900000000000009510.95000000000000095

BaselineOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay0.50.440.690000000000000950.40.560000000000000050.510.71000000000000096CoachedOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay11Post-TIPSOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay110.670000000000011030.7400000000000039910.75000000000000799110.670000000000011031BaselineOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay0.50.440.690000000000000950.40.560000000000000050.510.71000000000000096CoachedOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay11Post-TIPSOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay110.670000000000011030.7400000000000039910.75000000000000799110.670000000000011031

BaselineOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay0.490.470.450.450.0500.480CoachedOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay0.750000000000011990.67000000000001603Post-TIPSOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay0.630000000000012990.441

BaselineOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay0000000CoachedOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay11Post-TIPSOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMay11

DORA Foundations Score

Newton et al., 2010:

Effects of TIPS Training on Team Meeting Foundations

Pre TIPS Training Post-TIPS Training

ExpPrePost/Exp6376ControlPrePost/Exp5759

DORA Thoroughness of Decision Making Score (Simple)

Newton et al., 2010:

Effects of TIPS Training on Team Decision-making

Pre TIPS Training Post-TIPS Training

ExpPrePost/Exp4376ControlPrePost/Exp3528

Professional Citations for TIPS

Algozzine, B., Newton, J.S., Horner, R., Todd, A., & Algozzine, K.M. (in press). Development and technical adequacy of a team decision making assessment tool. Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment.

Newton, J.S., Horner, R., Algozzine, B., Todd, A., & Algozzine, K. M. (2009). Using a problem-solving model for data-based decision making in schools. In W. Sailor, G. Dunlap, G. Sugai, & R. Horner (Eds.). Handbook of positive behavior support. New York: Springer, 551-580.

Newton, J.S., Horner, R., Algozzine, B., Todd, A., & Algozzine, K. M. (in press). Randomized waitlist control analysis of team-initiated problem solving with elementary schools. Journal of School Psychology.

Newton, J.S., Horner, R., Todd, A., Algozzine, B., & Algozzine, K., (in press). Descriptive evaluation of a Team Initiated Problem-Solving (TIPS) model for data-based decision making in schools. Education and Treatment of Children

Todd, A., Horner, R., Newton, J.S. Algozzine, B., & Algozzine, K. & Frank, J. (2011). Effects of Team-Initiated Problem Solving on Practices of School-wide Behavior Support Teams. Journal of Applied School Psychology, 27, 42-59..

Eight Keys to Effective Meetings

1.Organization (team roles, meeting process, agenda)

2.Data (Right information at right time in right format)

3.Separate (a) Review of On-going Problem Solving (b) Administrative Logistics and (c) New Problem Solving

4.Define Problems with Precision

5.Build Comprehensive Solutions that fit

6.Add Action Plans for all solutions

7.Review Fidelity and Impact regularly

8.Adapt Solutions in response to data.

Main Ideas

Decisions are more likely to be effective and efficient when they are based on data.

The quality of decision-making depends most on the first step (defining the problem to be solved)

Define problems with precision and clarity

Main Ideas

Data help us ask the right questionsthey do not provide the answers: Use data to

Identify problems

Refine problems

Define the questions that lead to solutions

Data help place the problem in the context rather than in the students.

Main Ideas

The process a team uses to problem solve is important:

Roles:

Facilitator; Recorder; Data analyst; Active member

Organization

Agenda; Old business (did we do what we said we would do); New business; Action plan for decisions.

What happens BEFORE a meeting

What happens DURING a meeting

What happen AFTER a meeting

Main Ideas

Build decision systems not data systems

Use data in decision layers

Is there a problem? (overall rate of ODR)

Localize the problem

(location, problem behavior, students, time of day)

Get specific

Dont drown in the data

Its OK to be doing well

Be efficient

Problem-Solving Meeting Foundations

Structure of meetings lays foundation for efficiency & effectiveness

5/3/2012

Newton, J. S., Todd, A. W., Algozzine, K., Horner, R. H., & Algozzine, B. 2008

20

Meeting Foundations Elements

Four features of effective meetings

Predictability

Participation

Accountability

Communication

Define roles & responsibilities

Facilitator, Minute Taker, Data Analyst

Use electronic meeting minutes format

21

Newton, J. S., Todd, A. W., Algozzine, K., Horner, R. H., & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon, unpublished training manual.

Basic Meeting Foundations Elements are essential no matter what type of meeting is being conducted. Teams need to know the purpose and expected outcomes of their group, they need to establish operating agreements (always start with something nice, avoid side talk, be on time, etc), and they need to establish roles and the expected responsibilities .

21

5/3/2012

A. Predictability

Defined roles, responsibilities and expectations for the meeting

Start & end on time, if meeting needs to be extended, get agreement from all members

Agenda is used to guide meeting topics

Data are reviewed in first 5 minutes of the meeting

Next meeting is scheduled

B. Participation

75% of team members present & engaged in topic(s)

Decision makers are present when needed

What makes a successful meeting?

Overview of what makes a successful meeting

22

What makes a successful meeting?

C. Accountability

7. Facilitator, Minute Taker & Data Analyst come prepared for meeting & complete during the meeting responsibilities

8.System is used for monitoring progress of implemented solutions (review previous meeting minutes, goal setting)

9.System is used for documenting decisions

10. Efforts are making a difference in the lives of children/students.

D. Communication

11.All regular team members (absent or present) get access to the meeting minutes within 24 hours of the meeting

12.Team member support to practice team meeting norms/agreements

Define roles for effective meetings

Core roles

Facilitator

Minute taker

Data analyst

Active team member

Administrator

Backup for each role

Can one person serve multiple roles?

Are there other roles needed?

Typically NOT the administrator

24

Newton, J. S., Todd, A. W., Algozzine, K., Horner, R. H., & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon, unpublished training manual.

We need primary people with a back up person for each role needed. It is encouraged to NOT have the administrator play a primary role for facilitator, data analyst, or minute taker. Administrators need to be flexible with what might come up and it is unpredictable when a situation causes administrator absence from a planned meeting. Since we know that this might occur, lets avoid problems and set up the roles so that the team is not dependent on administrators being at the full meetings 100% of the time.

5/3/2012

24

Newton, J. S., Todd, A. W., Algozzine, K., Horner, R. H., & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educat...

Recommended

View more >